Nuweiba's stonefish trigger great interest

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Emperor's last newsletter carried this piece from Nuweiba...

Another dive and another surprise on Emperor's house reef at the Hilton in Nuweiba! George and Joan Houghton were being guided one afternoon in May enjoying close encounters with a slipper lobster, yellow-mouthed, undulated and grey morays, nudibranchs and the usual prides of lionfish when they came across this trio of stonefish. Suddenly, and without warning, they took off in formation, propelling themselves around the coral block in the rather ungainly way that stonefish swim before landing, once again in perfect formation, on the other side of the block.

It is certainly not a common sight to observe swimming stonefish but this is the first time that I have ever seen a trio of them swimming together!

 

Well, this certainly got a lot of people responding and we will be carrying more on this in the next newsletter so be sure to sign up for it and get your email copy. In the meantime, Jim Pickup, Nuweiba's Dive Centre Manager, has replied on Facebook and sent an updated photo of the hard threesome...

0709 The Three Amigos stonefish nuweiba.jpgJim Pickup, Dive Centre Manager, Nuweiba, replies...

There have always been a number of Stonefish knocking about on our House Reef and hiding in the sea-grass. Whether these three are the same ones you saw last year I do not know. Certainly I have been seeing two big ones skulking side by side quite often, but this was my first sighting of these three. I have a better picture of them sitting still (left) perhaps you recognize their smiling faces!

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About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Bryony published on June 12, 2009 8:12 AM.

Nuweiba's alternative tentacles was the previous entry in this blog.

How air breathing diving animals hold their breath is the next entry in this blog.

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